Trump Administration Vastly Expands Fast-Track Deportation Process to Interior of the Country | Center for Victims of Torture

Trump Administration Vastly Expands Fast-Track Deportation Process to Interior of the Country

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

ST. PAUL, Minn. and WASHINGTON — Just a week after the Trump administration implemented Asylum Ban 2.0, and on the heels of reports that some administration officials want to zero out the refugee admissions program next year, Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Kevin K. McAleenan announced yet another policy that will create fear and uncertainty in the lives of asylum seekers and refugees, many of whom are torture survivors: massive expansion of the “expedited removal” process. Under the new rule, a significant number of noncitizens without valid documentation who are apprehended anywhere in the United States and cannot prove they have been in the United States for more than two years will be placed on a fast-track towards deportation, without the opportunity to go before an immigration judge to ask for asylum or other forms of protection.  

Significantly expanding expedited removal will disincentivize individuals who overstayed their visas or crossed the border undetected but who need and deserve safe haven from seeking asylum or another form of relief under our immigration laws. At the same time, it will further incentivize racial profiling within the interior of the United States—during the first year of the Trump administration, ICE encountered five times more U.S. citizens than in the last year of the Obama administration—and stoke fear in the communities of color in which many refugees and asylum seekers live.

Who’s affected:

Non-citizens without status apprehended anywhere within the interior of the United States, who were not admitted or paroled into the country, and cannot prove they have been in the United States for over two years, could be subjected to expedited removal under the new rule.

Here are some tips for asylum seekers and supporting agencies:

Asylees and refugees should carry proof of their status at all times regardless of how long they have been in the U.S.  

Asylum seekers who entered the United States within the last two years undetected and filed an asylum application with the asylum office should talk to an immigration attorney as soon as possible. 

Asylum seekers who entered the United States undetected and are considering filing an asylum application but have not yet done so should contact an immigration attorney before filing an application and make sure to ask how the expansion of expedited removal could affect their case.  

Individuals who have been in the United States longer than 2 years should carry proof showing that they have been continuously living in the United States for over 2 years.  

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The Center for Victims of Torture is a nonprofit organization headquartered in St. Paul, MN, with offices in Atlanta, GA, and Washington, D.C.; and healing initiatives in Africa and the Middle East. Visit www.cvt.org

Jenni Bowring-McDonough
jbowring [at] cvt.org
612.436.4886

Media Contact

Jenni Bowring-McDonough
Media Relations Manager
+1 612-436-4886 (office) or +1 651-226-3858 (mobile)
Journalists:  If you’d like to receive CVT press releases, please email your request to Jenni Bowring-McDonough at jbowring [at] cvt.org.

 

 

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